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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 442 (some duplicates have been removed)
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
to space to stem-cell research to name a few. can science stay objective out of politics? alex is co-author of science left behind, feel good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. welcome. >> thank you for having me on. >> sure. you argue here that for all of the talk about republicans being the enemy of science, anti-scientific rhetoric is a by partisan project. tell me how you came to this opinion that democrats are not necessarily the party of science. >> well, on a whole host of issues, so as you know, on the right the conservatives are wrong on evolution and on climate change, and there's this it media narrative that somehow anti-science believes are unique to the right side of the political spectrum. what i found through reading a lot of science is basically that the left side also has some pet ideas not lining up with the scientific mainstream. for instance, opposition to genetic modification. the california democratic party endorsed this proportion to label food in direct opposition to the american medical association. the anti-vaccine movement started on the lef
science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and then not messages that are speaking to a far broader size
campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sor
on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable and n
see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
off the race to the top, let's hire 100,000 new math and science teachers who are actually trained in math and science. let's continue to focus on early childhood education, makes a big difference for kids who are particularly low income. part of the race to the top let's figure out what are the dropout factors out there. a couple thousand schools where we know they are really underperforming and let's transform those schools. >> in the state of the union you said i'm putting you on notices, colleges, if you don't reduce this tuition, you don't see your funding dropped. is there any evidence that they have done anything to changed? that they have listened to that threat? >> there are some schools that we have. the biggest problem that we have with tuition, especially at public universities, is state legislatures have been shifting priorities, and what we've said to state legislatures is you've got to do your part and prioritize this because how well your state does is going to depend on how good -- how well your work force is educated, but what we've also seen is schools starting t
is a professor of political science at the university of san diego. he has worked on campaigns going back to the 1970s, and he is also the author of "the candidate." welcome back inside "the war room," profez or. >> it's a pleasure to be back with you governor. >> jennifer: all right. do you think this has been taken to a new level this year? >> i think it has been taken to a new level every year, and gets more mindless meaningless and irrelevant every year. >> jennifer: i love that. because? because? is it going to matter? >> no, nobody cares what you thought going in. if you think your team is going to lose and they lose is that better than if you think they are going to win and they lose. [ laughter ] >> what counts is what happens in the debate not what you tell people. this is like a high school pep rally. >> jennifer: all right. i want to talk a little bit about prep, because you had some very interesting experiences. you played ronald reagan for jimmy carter ahead of the 1980 debates, and in your book you write this about what hand to president carter . . . what t
. especially in critical areas that turned up in that new staffing report. subjects like math, computer science, science areas like physics and chemistry, special- education, english as a second language, and world languages. this math teacher is evidence of what is possible. >> i love where i am. love teaching and i love the building and in. the kids are great. i like it a lot. >> he got his start with a baltimore county scholarship to encourage high school students to choose a teaching career. >> we think is really cool a former graduate our school would be able to come back and be a teacher. the faculty is very excited about it. especially teachers to have him as a student here. >> more than 100 high-school students are setting their sights on teaching. >> i demand -- there already planning lessons and designing activities and it's really nice. >> the state is going after people who would consider teaching as a second career. to see the entire report, log onto our web site, wbaltv.com, and click on education. >> foreign-policy is the focus in tonight pasqua been 20 will report. >> how the ca
: good. you're an essayist and a critic on philosophy, mathematics and science and you have a new book called "why does the world exist: an existential detective story." >> you say that sarcastically. (laughter) >> stephen: that's as sincere as i get. (laughter) first question: why does world exist exist? (laughter) what led you to write this book? >> good question. i was raised in a very religious family. >> stephen: what kind? >> catholic. >> stephen: how religious were you? >> i said the rosary. i did--. >> stephen: basic stuff, basic stuff. >> i confessed my sins. >> stephen: are you still catholic? >> no. >> stephen: well then how religious could your family have been? evidently they failed. >> yeah, they told me this story that the world exists because god--. >> stephen: in the beginning. >> exactly. there's already a book about that, by the way. (laughter) so you listened and then at some point you said i don't buy it. >> i began to have doubts and i want to know why the universe exists. if there's a reason i want to know that and god might be the reason, you may believe that bu
that they can come and take culinary classes and get jobs in a restaurant industry, a number of computer science classes here will get you a job at twitter, zynga. >> officials here have until october 15th to submit an action plan aimed at turning around city college. in san francisco rob ross, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> california's community college system is getting a new leader. gab rice paris is named the next over state's 112 campus system. he'll replace jack who retired this month. paris previously led the reno community college district in sacramento area. make up the nation's largest public college system. >>> over at uc berkeley citizen union workers held a rally today in support of five campus who have been laid off. the building they were assigned to were being demolished. they were denied the opportunity to transfer to other open positions. the university tells ktvu it is work wg the custodians to help find them similar jobs but they need to apply to different departments like any other campus employee. >>> the national hockey league announced today it is canceling the entire preseaso
dignitaries cut a piece of crime scene tape to officially open the new lab. >> forensic sciences will specialize particularly in dna testing, firearms and fingerprints and will have a fully functioning public health lab as well. >> reporter: gone are the days when evidence collected from rape victims sat on shelves untested and dna from cold cases went unanalyzed. >> it was a lot of work and i lot of advocacy. but can i tell you why i'm really here? i'm here for the moms of homicide victims who they labored so long and so hard to try to get this lab built and victims of sexual assault who were victimized twice when their rape kits weren't tested. >> reporter: kathy patterson help put the lab's initial pieces in place. first two floors of the building house the crime lab where firearms will be tested and fingerprints examined. the dna lab, which for the last two years occupied space in lorton, now has a permanent home. an entire floor will house the city's morgue where autopsies will be done. there is even a toxicology lab. >> to reduce this to what it is all about, it is more lik
, and other research is a tuition for developing the next-generation of sciences in the biomedical spear and for generating new ideas in the bio tech industry and several others depend on. despite all of these good things, there has been little change in the budgets since the 5-year doubling of the budget. when the count in inflation, we are back in buying power. with the rapid growth of the medical community and increased expense of bioscience work, the success rate for grant applicants has fallen to an all- time low to about 14% of nci and 17% nih wide. that is an ironic comment at the time when the scientific opportunities are remarkably high in part because many prior investments -- and the result of deciphering the blueprint of living organisms through the human genome project. they analyze the chromosomes of many microorganisms. the ability to support and enlarging and scientific community, the by medical ecosystem is under unusual stress. there is more investment elsewhere in other countries and more stable environment for research. we are running the risk of losing leadership to
saying we ought to be reality-based and science-based. we need to go back to a science and reality-based approach to policymaking. and by the way, i sit on the armed services committee and who leads the fight on the climate change in a smart and 21st century way. it is the military because they know that energy security will benefit us. that there will be environmental benefits and that the job creation will help get our economy back. >> jennifer: they're defending our country to make us independent from foreign oil too. it is lives in our military. i gotta go. but senator i just so appreciate you joining me inside "the war room." you're thoughtful. you're a battler for the things that are important. hopefully we can get you more help after the election. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >>. >> jennifer: up next, the president has numerous foreign policy achievements that he can claim. but what about mitt romney's foreign policy credentials other than insulting the british at the olympics? and there's a ne
, but wt i've proposed moving forward, building off of the race to the top, let's hire new math and science teachers who are trained in math and science without being thrown i the classroom without the eparioey. focus on early childhood education. part of our race to the top is let's figure out what are the dropout factories out there. some schools are really underperforming. let' transform tho schools. and all tseitont we have to do is combine creativity and evidence-based approaches. so let's not use ideology. let's figure out what works and combine that with resources. and this is big argument and big difference that i'ot gnoomney in this election. they talk a good game about reform, but when you actually look at budgets, they're talking about slashing our investment education by 20, 25%. we've already seen 300,000 teachers that have been fired ross the country, and a a consequence class sizes have gone up by 5%. and when you talk with a teacher -- i was meeting wita couple of teachers in las vegas -- they said they've got 42 kids in a class, some of them sitting on floor. it takes a cou
science to that, as well, when i was governor. two, they worked on a statewide curriculum. it took a number of years, but they had a series of elements they felt students needed to learn. three, they would evaluate annually the success of various schools. all the schools actually. and if a school consistently fell below a passing grade, then the state had the capacity to step in, take over the school, remove its leadership, and actually remove elements of the union contract if they believed those elements interfered with the education of a child. beyond that, i had the chance not just to have this, if you will, the stick if you can't pass the graduation exam you can't graduate, i also worked to put in place a carrot, an incentive. while i was governor, we passed legislation that said that if you took the exam to graduate and you were among the top quarter in your high school in terms of the grade you got on that exam, then you were entitled to the john and an about a gail adams scholarship, which was four years tuition free at any massachusetts public institution of higher learning
of english, at least three years of mathematics, at least three years of science and at least three years of social science, comparedded to those who students who did not complete a core curriculum, those students completing a core curriculum scored 144 points higher on the s.a.t. >> suarez: what do we know about the predictive value of the test itself? you have a threshold for college readiness. if you go into an institution of higher learning without reaching that threshold, are you automatically going to fail, not complete? what do we know? >> absolutely not. that threshold is a guide. it allows us to look at groups of students. what we know is that the group of students who meet the threshold have a 65% likelihood of achieving a b-minus g.p.a. or higher during their freshman year. obviously there are other factors that admission officers take into consideration. but it does help guide us in thinking about where we are and the need to have more students better prepared for college. currently of 100 ninth graders, 44 will go on to college. yet only 21 will graduate within a six-year per
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
viewed more than 4- 1/2 million times. in the video he says evolution is fundamental to all life science and parents should not encourage children to reject it. he produced this in response to efforts to present bible stories as a alternative to evolution in public schools. >>> a turn for a big rig accident. the driver lost control of a 18 wheeler filled with beer. it happened yesterday in downtown. the driver took the exit too fast that caused the rig to flip. it doesn't appear the driver was under the influence. >>> a condition called zombie bees has been discovered in washington. it causes bees to fly at night and lurch till they die. a bee keeper in washington found the first bees in that state. a biologist in san francisco discovered them in california in 2008. he uses a website to track it across the country. >>> mayor ed lee alawed the commission on -- applauded the commission on domestic violence. mayor ed lee said the commission helped cut domestic violence homicides by 80% and he promised to improve those numbers even more. >> to keep that work up. to keep the issues in front o
is painfully low on the list of science or engineers or technology and what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low. what should be down about it? >> i think it is priorities and greed. at the end of the day it is greed and lack of leadership to the point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money on prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in mercury don't get it. >> general? >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. one of the problems that we have is we are an older manufacturing economy. we are used to paper orders and other things if you go to china and you look at a network like alibaba. we can move more into the internet age in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as? >> i think that we live in a diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something that is great. but america is excelling in something as well. with china it could burst ladders of opportunity. many people are stuck in
best educated and best trained workers in the world. that is why we trained 1000 more mass and science teachers. -- that is why we insisted on 100,000 more math and science teachers. we need that. we want to recruit these folks fifth as community colleges, we know we can create 2 million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing jobs of the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. in the next four years. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. ladies and gentlemen,there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask fifth very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million fifth we are going to c
-changing high-tech world. >> the science has grown dramatically in the last 20 years. and it will be a gradual transition. but i think it's the way yes we have to do. it is the way of the future. and with the science advancing as rapidly as it is, i think it makes good sense. >> reporter: lanier praises the current officers who will get other uniform duties. the new $220 million headquarters of the city's chief medical examiner and state-of-the-art laboratories for crime scene analysis. it's due to open on monday and expected to improve police and prosecution work on thousands of cases. the chief medical officer responsible for all death investigations also will move from its rundown headquarters near the old d.c. general hospital to the new facility that will be run by a civilian director. but the d.c. fraternal order of police union says the city is making a mistake replacing seasoned sworn officers who know crime scenes. >> unless you're going to replace the experts, and that's what those guys are, experts, with experts, then that's potentially a problem. >> reporter: the union contends the
robotic claw. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. sleep train's inveis ending soon. sale save 10%, 20%, even 35% on a huge selection of simmons and sealy clearance mattresses. get 2 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. even get free delivery! sleep train stacks the savings high to keep the prices low. but hurry, the inventory clearance sale is ending soon. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ 7:16 a.m. and take a look at the weather elsewhere. there's a twist so yesterday. it rips through a small town that was outside of st. louis. it brought strong winds that were strong enough to blo
of georgetown's institute for law, science and global security. and i apologize if i butchered your last names. we will correct that in the feeds. >> it's great to be with all of you this morning i want to issue an apology if any of you are a twitter follower of mine. i have about 11,000 of them, and i guess yesterday they all got a little telling them that it just seemed and in this fantastic video. if you just clicked right your they could see it. at i think there is of a thousand friends, cycling through, this is the first time, it's ironic that i've ever fallen for one of the sort of cyber gags. i don't know what information they got from the, but nonetheless i wanted to kind of mentioned it and out myself as someone who is falling prey to the very folks out in cyber land. we have with us as mentioned katherine as executive director of georgetown institute for law, science and global security. she directs the global, george and cybersecurity project, and she also interestingly in the past, work with someone i'm well acquainted with, brent scowcroft from 2002-2006 as counsel to the presiden
information that i am reporting on. i mean it's 400 pages of science, new discoveries of -- that should be changing the way we think about women and arousal and helping us understand that men's and women's sexual responses are not the same. just conventional wisdom that we are talk in from 40 years ago there is this amazing new neuroscience that shows there is a brain gentleman va gina vagina connection that people may be upset about not my leaders they are thrilled to learn more about themselves. the data explains why 30% of women report low sexual desire and another 30% some of the same well, some different, say that they don't reach orgasm when they want to. even in a hyper sexual icedized society. this is t*s not working for not working for women but this explains why. >> gavin: you are working around the mind vagina connection about, how is that controversial? it connects -- >> it's so funny, i wrote a book called misconceptions about the birthing industry which documented to understand of data on the brai
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
nobody is behind the wheel. >> today we are looking at science fiction becoming reality. >> the fine the notion, and governor jerry brown arrived at google in a self driving a car to accelerate california's leadership in autonomous vehicles. google has already logged 300,000 mi. with this technology. a new law allows them on public roads for testing as long as a licensed and insured drivers behind the wheel. the governor signed legislation in front of an audience of google employees. a google co-founder was asked when the public might get their hands on it >> we have some pretty ambitious targets for the team, they are stressed out looking at me answer this question >> he did say five years or less into believes it will save lives. 99 percent of all traffics in fatal accidents are caused by human error >> i suspect it will be far safer than human driven cars >> it also opens up the possibility of the blind people driving. cutting down on congestion, these cars automatically align themselves with precision and allow people to do something else while driving. who gets the ticket in a s
may sound like science fiction but google headquarters where engineers are working to make the dream a reality. explains a new and modernized of the road. >> perhaps the drive point governor jerry brown arrived today at google headquarters toyota. he then went inside and signed a law clearing the way for driverless cars to hit the road. >> self driving car is another step forward in this long march of california pioneering the future and leading not just the country, the whole world. >> the new law will set standards including requiring a human being to be behind the wheel in case of an emergency, but that may eventually change according to google cofounder. >> you can have a car drop you off at work, get out, walk through a little bit of space, and it goes off and takes somebody else somewhere else. >> he says driverless cars may enable large car sharing and potentially reduce the demand for parking. engineers say driverless cars will not be subject to what most automobile crashes, human error. >> i expect going to be far safer than human-driven cars. >> judging by a reaction, some
, listed as athletic director taught math, science and language arts. the superintendent said she learned of the allegations monday, placed him on lee and called police. she says school -- police him on leave and call police. she says the school will reach out to parents, counseling available to students. e-mail sent to parents yesterday afternoon telling them about the situation and how a substitute will be coming in. next week the students will be distributed among regular teachers. expected to be in court on friday afternoon. there are dozens and dozens of people stepping forward saying in has to be a misunderstanding, there is no possible way that this man who they knew could possibly have done this. terry mcsweeney, abc7 news. >>> 4:33. more developing news, san francisco police moved in overnight and cleared out a camp on market street, closed streets took down tents and cited 40 people. amy hollyfield joins us from the federal reserve building. are police still out there? >> reporter: there are still officers out here. in fact, we've seen them on several corners. they are watching
? >> sam? >> it's a cumulus cloud. >> you have to try the science department. >>> this controversial headline, talking about a mom gene. there's some new research that says that could be something that actually gets that some women are better suited to give birth and be mothers. >> i have mom jeans. >> i'm wearing them now. cue the music. >>> get ready, everybody. trash to treasure in the house. it was a staple on "gaa." welcome to "gma" with this anchor showdown, like we've never done before. going to show you how to transform flea market bargains into stunning showpieces, we hope. yeah. we'll do our best, lara. >> that would be good of you. >> you might understand -- >> i'm lowering expectations, as the presidential nominees are both doing. >>> now, to the shocking murder mystery out of hollywood, that ended up with an up-and-coming tv actor dead. johnny lewis and officials say he went on a violent rampage, allegedly killing his landlady and then himself. was a designer drug behind all of it? abc's david wright has the latest from los angeles. david? >> reporter: that's the working
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 442 (some duplicates have been removed)